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Carrickfergus

I wish I was in Carrickfergus
Where the castle looks out to sea
I would swim over the deepest ocean
For my love to be with me

But the sea is wide, and I cannot swim over
Nor have I the wings to fly

I wish I had a handsome boatman
To ferry me over, my love and I
I wish I was in the land of Eire
Where the mountains reach the sea
Where flowers blossom as I do remember
Where my true love came to me

But the sea is wide, and I cannot swim over
Nor have I the wings to fly

Ah, to be back now in Carrickfergus
To be together, my love and I
To be together, my love and I
I wish I was in Carrickfergus
To be together, my love and I

The History of Carrickfergus

The medieval town of Carrickfergus is around nine miles north of Belfast city on the Co Antrim coast road. A medium sized town with a population of approximately 33,000. There is a 18-hole golf coarse, a small patch of sandy beach (north of the town), harbour, and a marina stocked heavily with yachts and other small boats. The biggest attraction in the town is the Anglo Norman Castle situated a stone throw from the town's main shopping area and right beside the harbour. The castle is built on a basalt rock which protrudes about 300 yards out into the sea.

The town takes it's name from the basalt rock: "The rock of Fergus", off which Fergus, who founded the Royal House of Scotland, was drowned according to legend. John de Courcy or his kinsman (Hugh de lacy) built the castle. King John slept in the castle on his visit to Ireland in 1210. Edward Bruce took possession of it after a years siege but his victory was short lived. On the ancient quay under it's western wall, King William landed on his way to the battle of the Boyne, a traditional spot on where he first stepped on Irish soil is pointed out. A statue of him was erected in 1990 close to the front of the castle. The French captured the town in 1760 but later their forces were defeated off the Isle of Man, and 18 years later, Paul Jones, the American sailor commanding the "Ranger", defeated the English warship "Drake" in Belfast Lough.







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